Unlimited micro commission for Omeima Mudawi-Rowlings

With the support of an Unlimited Micro Commission, Omeima Mudawi-Rowlings will make an experimental short film, that will tell a number of stories. It will rexamine the artists intersectionality through the lense of her father and amplified by Black Lives Matter. It will be a space on film that expose’s the issues from the perspective of a deaf female sudanese second generation migrant, stuck behind a glass ceiling and the leadership that my father attained in his life that feels currently out of the artists grasp.

Omeima Mudawi-Rowlings says, “My collaborations with hearing artists and organisations have significantly developed my artistic process and found a context for my work: “Eye2Eye” was a collaborative visual arts project with glass artist Miranda Ellis. “The river runs through” at Fabrica Gallery, Brighton was a large-scale immersive installation, initially supported with an Unlimited R&D. I was commissioned by Artichoke: Procession, to work with a Brighton based, integrated Deaf and hearing community group to design and sew a banner for the suffragette commemoration March in London, June 2018.

What Omeima Mudawi-Rowlings wants to achieve with the film

All things trend toward disorder. My aim is to make an experimental short film, a number of stories will be distributed across the screen at the same time, depicting an energy that is constrained by the aesthetic of words, textiles and old photographs; that halt the narrative in a moment before moving on again to depict another instance of my consciousness, that will rexamine my intersectionality through the lense of my father and amplified by Black Lives Matter. It will be an animation that will bring together the forces in my life that resonate with a power that never decreases, even though I feel stuck behind a glass ceiling and the leadership that my father attained in his life feels currently out of my grasp.

My fathers life, sadly ended two weeks ago. My father was a Sudanese public spokemans, interviewed on Television, and asked to comment on injustice, he was a judge and community leader. He was a keen photographer, I will use his pictures. My aunt has eight hours of interview footage with my father, I will extract his words and write them down. At the age of 12 my father listened to me, and for the benefit of my little brother we left Sudan for a better education and life as a deaf person. It was economic migration. I can not see my life as it is now, if I remained in Sudan, but my attachment is strong to the country that me and my father left. Black Lives Matters has affected me in an unimaginable way. I want to distill in the film the words used in the Black Lives Matters campaign to craete a space to see the issues from my perspective as a deaf female sudanese second generation migrant.

When the 1 minute 30 second film complete, I will invite Musician Rihab Azar to compose and play the Oud and record a sound track.